It's all about the creek…and the mountains

The Tusquittee Valley

Tusquittee Valley

First, let’s learn where the name “Tusquittee” came from…

“Where the Water Dogs Laughed”

salamander

According to folklore, a Cherokee hunter crossing over Tusquittee Bald in a very dry season, heard voices, and creeping silently toward the place from which the sound proceeded, peeped over a rock and saw two water-dogs walking together on their hind legs along the trail and talking as they went. Their pond had dried up and they were on the way over to Nantahala river. As he listened one said to the other, “Where’s the water? I’m so thirsty that my apron (gills) hangs down,” and then both water-dogs laughed.

But what exactly is a “Water Dog”?  The cool forests and plentiful rivers, streams and creeks of our little corner of the mountains of Appalachia make it the perfect home to more salamander species than any other part of the world. Appalachia may be known for many things: its music, its industry, its culture, but what about its salamanders? It turns out, of the 550 known salamander species in the world, 77 can be found in this mountainous area, more than any other one region in the world. Many of them can only be found there. Here at Casa on the Creek, you can walk just steps from your cabin and begin your search for these elusive creatures right in Tusquittee Creek as well as the smaller branch that runs through the property.

And now, what’s so special about the Tusquittee Valley,
or as we like to say, “our little corner of the mountains…”

Here’s what The Blue Ridge Highlander has to say:
The Tusquittee Valley located north of the town Hayesville is likely the most beautiful of the three.  Enclosed by high mountain ranges and dissected through its center by the Tusquittee Creek, Tusquittee Valley is by far something quite unique.  Most certainly this mountain valley is a prize-winning photo opportunity at every turn.  A mostly residential community this quiet serene mountain valley is revered by both its residents and regional mountain neighbors as well as visitors the Clay County. Our subdivision, called Tusquittee Landing, incorporates a 2700 foot grass airstrip. Most people assume the “Landing” refers to the airplanes landing. However, it actually is a carryover from the days where the mules dragged logs down from the forest to a landing on Goldmine Creek. The logs were then moved down the creek to Tusquittee Creek and eventually to the sawmill.

Tusquittee Valley
Tusquittee Valley
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